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INFO

 

Volunteer

We have volunteer shifts for events during our off months too for special events.
If you’re interested in volunteering with the Halifax Pop Explosion send an email to volunteer@halifaxpopexplosion.com.

 
 

Accessibility

Halifax Pop Explosion is dedicated to listening to our community, audience and performers to actively improve the accessibility of our festival. We welcome and encourage all feedback and suggestions from our patrons.

We are a city based festival, operating in 15+ venues across the HRM with varying levels of accessibility. Halifax Pop Explosion has worked with the venues to provide information on the accessibility of each venue. Click the button below to download our venue accessibility pdf.

Halifax Pop Explosion will do it’s very best to accommodate those who require assistance to attend our festival. If you require assistance to attend Halifax Pop Explosion, please email info@halifaxpopexplosion.com. Additional comments, questions, suggestions, and concerns can be addressed to that email.

 
 
 
 

About HPX

Since 1992, Halifax Pop Explosion Festival and Conference (HPX) has been bringing tomorrow’s headliners to Halifax, and helping music fans discover their next favourite bands. Starting as a small, multi-venue festival showcasing local talent and bringing new sounds to the city, the Festival has grown into a 4 day city-wide music and comedy takeover that attracts some of the most exciting talent, ecstatic fans, and industry professionals from around the world. 

With multiple venues across the city, HPX is one of the largest and most exciting music festivals and conferences on the East Coast. For over 25 years, HPX has been a festival of live music exploration and discovery. Year after year, the Festival leaves a lasting impression on the city — challenging the landscape of the local music scene and putting Halifax on the international industry map. 

The Halifax Pop Explosion Conference is dedicated to bringing together industry professionals, artists, and fans from around the world to discuss current trends, topics, and issues in the music industry. The conference has attracted delegates from around the world, and has started discussions and shared insights on the most important and relevant advancements and issues facing the ever-changing landscape of the music industry. 

If you’re a live music fan, this highly curated, city-wide music takeover is for you.
 

 
 

2018
A Festival of Discovery

HPX has always been about discovering new music — this year, that's truer than ever. 2018's highly curated lineup focuses on new-to-Halifax sounds, exciting local artists, and amazing comedians — with some surprises along the way! 

 
 

2013
The Laughs Get Bigger

The comedy programming expands with Brian Posehn, Todd Barry and David Heti (which sets the comedy tone for the next 5 years).

2007
15 Years Celebrated

With all but 3 Canadian headliners, HPX celebrates 15 amazing years shaping the Halifax music scene.

 
 

2001
HPX Returns

The Halifax Pop Explosion was re­launched in 2001 under its original name by Waye Mason as a not-­for-­profit association.

2000
The Year of No Music

The volunteer based, no-profit, no-sleep festival model put a lot of stress on the principle organizers, and no festival was held.

 
 

1996
Relaunched as Halifax on Music

Halifax on Music became a pivotal event for the music community in Halifax and beyond. Thanks to Angie Fenwick, Cinnamon Toast and Murderecords kingpin Colin MacKenzie and colleague Marc Brown, and No Records founder Waye Mason, the festival thrived throughout the late 90s. 

1993
The Birth of Halifax Pop Explosion

Held in September, HPX was founded by the brainchild of music impresario Peter Rowan and legendary promoter Greg Clark.

 
 
 

We would like to acknowledge that the festival takes place in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People. This territory is covered by the “Treaties of Peace and Friendship” which Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) people first signed with the British Crown in 1725. The treaties did not deal with surrender of lands and resources but in fact recognized Mi’kmaq and Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) title and established the rules for what was to be an ongoing relationship between nations.